Category Archives: Skills

10 Reasons Why You Don’t Need To Give Up

In life sometimes we all feel like giving up but we simply can’t, here are ten reasons why:

REASON 1: You have already started. There is no need in stopping half way. I am sure stopping half way would not bring back all the time you have invested in ensuring that you achieve this project/plan.

REASON 2: You are almost there. Most times, problems don’t come until you are almost there. Remember, one painful thing about life is not achieving something you knew you could achieve, something that was almost within your reach. Continue reading 10 Reasons Why You Don’t Need To Give Up

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Should Anyone Be Jobless?

Vanessa Evans reached her mid-thirties, bored with her job as a paralegal. She had been promised more responsibilities, but more young, fresh-from-law-school attorneys were added to the staff. Finally realizing that her job was a dead end, she began taking stock of what she wanted to do with the rest of her life.

Somehow, she knew that becoming an attorney with the prospects of handling divorce suits and debating property line disputes was not for her. Vanessa was told by a job counselor that she was “getting to the age where she would be hard to place” and that she had just about reached her potential income level in the job where she was. The counselor urged Vanessa, at age 33, to be happy and stay put.

I wonder how many of us that has received this kind of advice in the past, when your parents, teachers, mentors and other experts told you the things you can do and the things you cannot do. Who is better placed to tell you what is possible and what is not? Who knows the power and beauty of your dreams more than you? How did Vanessa react to the advice of the job counselor? Let’s find out.

Angrily, Vanessa left the office, refusing to be limited by the tunnel vision of a job counselor. So what did she want to do with the rest of her life? She had many capabilities, but Vanessa couldn’t decide what she did well enough to make a career out of it. Finally calming down, the determined woman decided to start from square one. What had been her best subject in school? The answer was English. She began evaluating the career choices.

Teaching held no appeal, nor did advertising. It came down to two choices: Vanessa could either read other peoples’ work, or write her own. When she made the conscious commitment that she should be a participant in life, rather than an observer, Vanessa went back to night school and polished her writing skills. Before long, she was happily earning her living as an author.

If you take inventory of your talents, the skills you possess or the skill you can acquire, it will amaze you what will be the outcome.

I still don’t believe anyone should be jobless. There are things to do. Convert that hobby of yours and you could be on your way to building an empire.

All you need is the courage to start small and the discipline to stay focused until you achieve greatness.

It is in you!

You Can Change the World

James Watt was born on January 19, 1736 in Scotland, in the small port of Greenock near the mouth of the River Clyde. His father is a trained carpenter and can build anything, from furniture to ships. Mr. Watt’s fine business sense and skills brought good money into the family’s home. Although not rich, he and his wife Agnes were comfortable. They needed that comfort, for their home life together was blighted by sadness. Agnes had baby after baby, and they all died.

When James was born, she re-doubled her efforts to protect her baby from the dozens of illnesses that threatened children then. This time, she succeeded and James – a thin, weakly little boy – survived. But his ailments survived with him. All through his childhood, he suffered from migraines and dreadful toothaches, and they condemned him to a sort of double life. One day, he’d be talkative, friendly, interested in everyone and everything around him; the next, he’d lost in a haze of pain.

He was obviously bright but, at first, his migraines stopped him attending school. So his parents – themselves highly intelligent – started educating him at home. Agnes taught him to read; her husband, busy though he was, made time to give him lessons in writing and arithmetic. He also gave him a small carpentry set; armed with miniature saws and chisels, the boy took all his toys to pieces, put them together again, and then invented new ones.

James spent a childhood as happy as his troubled health would allow. Watt learned everything about his father’s business and by mid-teens, his mind was made up. He wanted to be a maker of scientific instruments, not a carpenter nor a shipwright.

In 1754, he left home to acquire more training in Glasgow. Later, he was over-worked, under-nourished and rejected until he met Joseph Black, a hugely-distinguished scientist who’d just been appointed professor of chemistry of Glasgow University. Black arranged things so that Watt could set up shop in the university grounds. And they made it official by giving him the title of “Mathematical Instrument Maker to the University”. This was all the support Watt needed to achieve his dream. He eventually invented a new improved steam engine.

His steam engine was faster, cheaper and more powerful than any earlier model. His Steam Engine was to harness power in a way never achieved before and one that would mark the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. Before the ‘Steam Age’ energy was provided by humans actually pushing and pulling, horses, wind or water – all of which have one main problem: they are controlled by nature, unpredictable, unreliable and not very strong.

The new steam engine could be used to pump the mines clear of water, to speed up production in the cotton mills, the flour mills, the steel factories. It changed the face of the world industrially and socially – papers were printed faster, trains were invented for land and steamships for water. Industry moved from a home-based craft trade to factory-based mass production. James Watt’s steam engine changed the world itself.

You too, can change the world. Make it happen.

Culled from Uju Onyechere’s post on MODELS AND MENTORS INT’L group on Facebook.

I Love Diamonds

Image from http://i-love-shirt-shop.com/2011/09/30/das-i-love-diamonds-shirt-jetzt-im-i-love-shirt-shop-erhaltlich/

Harry Winston, a New York diamond dealer heard about a wealthy Dutch merchant who was looking for a certain kind of diamond to add to his collection.

Winston called the merchant, told him that he thought he had the perfect stone, and invited the collector to come to New York and examine it.

The collector flew to New York and Winston assigned a salesman to meet him and show the diamond. When the salesman presented the diamond to the merchant, he described the expensive stone by pointing out all of its fine technical features.

The merchant listened and praised the stone but turned away and said. “It’s a wonderful stone but not exactly what I want.”

Winston, who had been watching the presentation from a distance, stopped the merchant going out the door and asked, “Do you mind if I show you that diamond once more?” The merchant agreed and Winston presented the stone.

But instead of talking about the technical features of the stone, Winston spoke spontaneously about his own genuine admiration of the diamond and what a rare thing of beauty it was. Abruptly, the customer changed his mind and bought the diamond.

While he was waiting for the diamond to be packaged and brought to him, the merchant turned to Winston and asked, “Why did I buy it from you when I had no difficulty saying no to you salesman?”

Winston replied, “That salesman is one of the best men in the business and he knows more about diamond than I do. I pay him a good salary for what he knows. But I would gladly pay him twice as much if I could put into him something that I have and he lacks. You see, he knows diamonds, but I love them.”

Beloved, do you have passion for what you do? Like Harry Winston, do you love what you do? Can you effectively communicate what you do to others? Positive answers to these questions can take you to the next level.

Culled from Uju Onyechere’s facebook post in MODELS & MENTORS INT’L GROUP

Who is a Salesman?

Salesman

We sell our colleagues, friends and family relations on doing things with us, like going to cinema, eating in a particular restaurant etc.

Parents sell their kids on believing in themselves – and on going to school, eating properly, sleeping at the appropriate time and even cleaning their environment.

Individuals, companies and agencies sell ideas, concepts, thoughts, opinions, and feelings. Teachers sell knowledge and discovery.

Every business, career, occupation, enterprise of any kind, is sales. In fact, every interaction you have with all of the people you come in contact with each day is sales.

These days, people tend to look at salespeople as those who do the dirty job. In fact any vacancy that advertises for a marketing position stands the chance of not having the best brains.

But the truth of the matter is that we all sell. It was Jay Abraham who observed, “The fact is, everyone is in sales. Whatever area you work in, you do have clients and you do need to sell.”

To succeed in selling, there are several things one will have to take into consideration. Here are a few of them. First, attitude is everything. Secondly, you must be enthusiastic. According to Harry Banks, “A sales man minus enthusiasm is just a clerk.”

Thirdly, appearance matters. Ken Kerr pointed out, “Up to 70% of people make buying decisions based primarily upon the visual.” Also, you constantly have to improve on your communication skills. Steve Brown hinted, “Talking is the train that carries the product to the market.”

Beloved, you and I are always selling. So be conscious of every interaction with people. Exactly why Emerson said everybody makes a living selling something.

Remember, the most important sale of the day is what we sell to ourselves.

Culled from Uju Onyechere’s post on facebook group – MODELS & MENTORS INT’L

Preparing for the end

BEGIN WITH THE END IN MIND

It has been busy for me in the past few months. I have grown by learning from my mistakes. Mistakes are important as they teach us things we would not have learnt by inaction. This brings me to mind to ask how we look forward to our ends.

If at the beginning of the year we had set goals to fire our year, how prepared are we to tick the checklist of things that we achieved and the ones we did not? Let me share with you one of the goals I set earlier this year. I started out the year with a goal to improve myself in the area of reading good books. I set a goal to read three books before the year end. Some may see this as a simple goal to achieve. I am not a good reader but I learnt from my mentor that readers are leaders. Something I want to really be – a Leader.

Unfortunately, I am not a good reader. But have I completed one book? No. Have I attempted to read? Yes. How many books? Four. Should I rate myself by how much progress I have made in reading such books, I would say I have improved my reading skills. I have completed the books in this order:

BOOK 1 (How to Win Friends and Influence peopleDale Carnegie) – 35% complete
BOOK 2 (The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People – Stephen Covey) – 26% complete
BOOK 3 (Men are from Mars, Women are from VenusJohn Gray) – 47% complete and
BOOK 4 (Think and Grow RichNapoleon Hill) – 53% complete

Think of the number of pages in these books and you would get a picture of what my thought process has been like since this year. Have I become better? Yes, in some ways especially in my thought process.

I used to be a person who likes to read on the go. I would rather read a blog on my mobile phone than sit down to read a full book. Now I have found time to read a book and have even increased my “focus-ability”.

Back to the subject of this post. One of the good ways I found in preparing for the end of the year is to take inventory. This to me, is a very important step in self-improvement. It helps you know where you are and guides your measurement and decision on areas to improve upon.

Another way I find useful is to meditate. Switch off all distractions (this should include all phones, laptops, and media player devices). Taking time out to listen to ones self is important in preparing for the end.

Lastly, asking for feedback from friends and family or people who are close to you can be of good help to aid in preparing for the end.

 

 

As the year draws to a close, I become very busy. This is the peak period for me in my place of work. Just in case I have no time to post at Christmas, I wish to thank you for reading my posts this year and I wish you a Merry Christmas and a prosperous new year in advance.

Set a bigger goal for 2014. 🙂

Multiple Skills for the 21st Century

21stCentSkills

Multiple Skills for the 21st Century

Written by Jim Rohn

I believe that in the 21st century it is so important to have multiple skills. But what I also find is that if you have an entrepreneurial business (or plan to in the future), you can gain the needed skills for the future while you create your income now.

Here’s my short list for on-the-job training, so that you can learn while you earn.

Sales

I began my journey with sales, which, of course, dynamically changed my life at age 25. The first year I multiplied my income by five. Being raised in farm country, I knew how to milk cows, but it didn’t pay well. Sales altered the course of my life, where I learned to present a valid product in the marketplace, talk about its virtues and get somebody to say “Yes.” Then give them good service.

Recruiting

Then came recruiting, how to expand my business and build an organization. We have all heard the question, is it better to have one person selling a $1,000 or have 100 people selling $10? If you ask me, I’ll take the 100 at $10. Once mastered, recruiting, the ability to multiply your efforts, is one of life’s and leadership’s greatest time-management resources.

Organizing

Then I learned organizing. Keeping your own schedule can be difficult at times, but now you have to balance multiple tasks and people to get maximum results. You will find that the payoff is massive once you have tapped into the synergy and momentum of group dynamics and teamwork.

Promotion

Next is promotion. First it’s the spring campaign and then the fall campaign, and then it’s this month’s objective’s campaign. You never know when it’s going to click for someone to want or need to buy from you or be a part of what you are doing, so having the offer or the special or the contest going when they’re ready can make all the difference.

Recognition

Then it’s the recognition. Some people work harder for recognition than they do for money. It’s the chance to belong. It’s getting people to do something that, ordinarily on their own, they wouldn’t think of doing. They could, but they don’t think of it. You come along with a little promotion for this month or this quarter and everything changes for them, and I found that paid big money.

Communication

Then I learned communication. How to do the training, how to do the teaching, and probably the greatest gift of all is learning how to inspire with words. Inspire people to see themselves better than they are with all of those gifts, all of those skills. Be the voice that tells them they have made a wise decision and here’s why.

Now, I believe with just this little short list I’ve given you, you’ll be equipped. We’ve all watched what has happened the last 15 years. The guy had one skill; the company downsizes. His division is eliminated and since he only had one skill, now he is vulnerable. He’s wandering around saying, “Oh my, the last few years I should have taken some classes that would have taught me a couple of more things and I wouldn’t be here in this vulnerable position.”

So my admonition: Learn some multiple skills, or should we say, backup skills for the 21st century, and no better place to learn them than in what you’re already doing now.

Jim Rohn, America’s Foremost Business Philosopher, reprinted with permission from Jim Rohn International © 2012. As a world-renowned author and success expert, Jim Rohn touched millions of lives during his 46-year career as a motivational speaker and messenger of positive life change. For more information on Jim and his popular personal achievement resources or to subscribe to the weekly Jim Rohn Newsletter, visit www.JimRohn.com